Academic Calendar

Philosophy (PHIL)

PHIL 1200  Introduction to Philosophy  6 cr  

An introduction to five main areas of philosophy. Topics are logical thinking; the criteria and limits of human knowledge; and three of: God, right and wrong, free will and the nature of consciousness, scientific inquiry, and social justice. Students may not hold credit for PHIL 1200 and any of: PHIL 1511 or the former PHIL 1510 or the former PHIL 1261.

Equiv To: PHIL 1261, PHIL 1510, PHIL 1511

Attributes: Humanities, Recommended Intro Courses

PHIL 1290  Critical Thinking  3 cr  

A course which helps students to think clearly and critically, and to present, defend, and evaluate arguments. The instructor will discuss good and bad reasoning, everyday fallacies, some specific argument forms such as the categorical syllogism, and ways and means of defining words. Students may not hold credit for PHIL 1290 and any of: PHIL 1291 or the former PHIL 1320 or PHIL 1321.

Equiv To: PHIL 1291

Mutually Exclusive: PHIL 1320, PHIL 1321

Attributes: Humanities, Recommended Intro Courses

PHIL 1300  Introduction to Logic  3 cr  

A course which helps students to think clearly and critically, and to present, defend and evaluate arguments. The course deals with categorical logic, non-formal fallacies, definition, modern symbolic logic and scientific method. Students may not hold credit for PHIL 1300 and the former PHIL 1320 or PHIL 1321.

Mutually Exclusive: PHIL 1320, PHIL 1321, PHIL 1330

Attributes: Humanities, Recommended Intro Courses

PHIL 1420  Philosophy as a Way of Life  3 cr  

This course explores various texts and traditions that offer visions of the good life and focuses on connecting philosophical arguments with contemporary issues and day-to-day decision making. The goal is to think deeply and rigorously about foundational questions like how should we live, does life have a meaning, what justifies our beliefs, what obligations do we have to each other, and how to make rational decisions.

Attributes: Humanities, Recommended Intro Courses

PHIL 2140  Theory of Knowledge  3 cr  

This course challenges and investigates our view of knowledge and rationality. Problems dealt with normally include: the nature of knowledge, sense experience, truth and necessary truth, the analytic-synthetic distinction, memory, induction, etc. Students may not hold credit for both PHIL 2140 and the former PHIL 2760.

Mutually Exclusive: PHIL 2760

Attributes: Humanities

PHIL 2150  Mind and Body  3 cr  

An introduction to theories of the mind and body, including dualism, identity theory and functionalism. The course deals with topics such as consciousness, thought, and desire.

Attributes: Humanities

PHIL 2160  Fundamentals of the Philosophy of Language  3 cr  

An introduction to theories of language, including those of Gottlob Frege and Bertrand Russell. The course deals with a variety of linguistic phenomena pertaining to names, definite descriptions, demonstratives, identity sentences, and belief reports.

PR/CR: A minimum grade of C is required unless otherwise indicated.
Prerequisite: [a grade of "C" or better in six credit hours of 1000-level philosophy] or [successful completion of 30 hours of university credit].

Attributes: Humanities

PHIL 2170  Special Topics  3 cr  

Topics and content may vary. Students can earn multiple credits for this course only when the topic subtitle is different.

Attributes: Humanities

PHIL 2190  Philosophy and Sexuality  3 cr  

This course examines various moral and legal issues related to sexuality. Topics may include: casual sex, monogamy, love, and commitment; the definition of marriage; the meaning of gender; the nature of consent; the moral and legal status of prostitution and pornography; the scope of sexual privacy and other moral challenges presented by new technology. Students may not hold credit for both PHIL 2190 and PHIL 2170 when titled "Sexuality."

Attributes: Humanities

PHIL 2200  Intermediate Logic  3 cr  

A systematic investigation of the theory and techniques of modern symbolic logic, with an examination of contributions made by contemporary philosophers in dealing with philosophical problems closely connected with logic. Students may not hold credit for both PHIL 2200 and the former PHIL 2430.

PR/CR: A minimum grade of C is required unless otherwise indicated.
Prerequisite: a grade of “C” or better in PHIL 1300 of the former PHIL 1320 or PHIL 1321 or written consent of instructor.

Mutually Exclusive: PHIL 2430

Attributes: Humanities

PHIL 2290  Ethics and Society  6 cr  

An examination of some contemporary ethical theories and their application to a number of practical issues. Issues to be discussed may include: reverse discrimination, freedom of expression, paternalism, and theories of punishment. Students may not hold credit for PHIL 2290 and any of the former PHIL 2531 or PHIL 2740 or PHIL 2741 or PHIL 2750 or PHIL 2751.

PR/CR: A minimum grade of C is required unless otherwise indicated.
Prerequisite: successful completion of 30 hours of university credit.

Equiv To: PHIL 2531

Attributes: Humanities

PHIL 2300  Political Philosophy  6 cr  

An analysis and evaluation of the main ideals - justice, freedom, happiness, equality, and self-realization - of the great political philosophers (e.g., Plato, Hobbes, Locke, Mill, and Marx) and of their theories of human nature and their blueprints for society. Students may not hold credit for both PHIL 2300 and PHIL 2301.

PR/CR: A minimum grade of C is required unless otherwise indicated.
Prerequisite: successful completion of 30 hours of university credit.

Equiv To: PHIL 2301

Attributes: Humanities

PHIL 2580  Metaphysics  3 cr  

A study of some fundamental problems relating to the nature of reality, e.g., mind and body, cause and effect, human freedom, and the problem of universals. Students may not hold credit for both PHIL 2580 and the former PHIL 2450.

PR/CR: A minimum grade of C is required unless otherwise indicated.
Prerequisite: a grade of "C" or better in six credit hours of Philosophy at the 1000 level.

Mutually Exclusive: PHIL 2450

Attributes: Humanities

PHIL 2612  A Philosophical History of Science  3 cr  

A philosophical study of the evolution of science and scientific methodology from the ancient Greeks to the present. A background in science is not required. Students may not hold credit for both PHIL 2612 and the former PHIL 2610.

Mutually Exclusive: PHIL 2610

Attributes: Humanities, Written English Requirement

PHIL 2614  Philosophy of Science  3 cr  

A critical study of the nature of scientific knowledge. A background in science is not required. Students may not hold credit for both PHIL 2614 and the former PHIL 2610.

Mutually Exclusive: PHIL 2610

Attributes: Humanities, Written English Requirement

PHIL 2630  Continental Rationalism  3 cr  

A study of the great Continental philosophers, Descartes, Spinoza, and Leibniz, who viewed reason, rather than experience, as the key to knowledge of the universe. Students may not hold credit for both PHIL 2630 and PHIL 2631.

Equiv To: PHIL 2631

Attributes: Humanities

PHIL 2640  British Empiricism  3 cr  

The course surveys and analyzes the theories of the great British empiricists, Locke, Berkeley, and Hume, on the nature and foundations of human knowledge and its relation to experience. Students may not hold credit for both PHIL 2640 and PHIL 2641.

Equiv To: PHIL 2641

Attributes: Humanities

PHIL 2650  Plato  3 cr  

An examination of Plato's views on knowledge, reality, human nature, politics, and morals through a study of his most significant dialogues. Students may not hold credit for both PHIL 2650 and the former PHIL 2651.

Equiv To: PHIL 2651

Attributes: Humanities

PHIL 2660  Aristotle  3 cr  

A study of Aristotle's most important views on reality, knowledge, human nature, morals, and politics. Students may not hold credit for both PHIL 2660 and PHIL 2661.

Equiv To: PHIL 2661

Attributes: Humanities

PHIL 2710  Twentieth-Century European Philosophy: Existentialism  3 cr  

This course will be devoted to a study of existentialist themes as they appear in the philosophical writings of some of the following: Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Camus, Sartre, de Beauvoir, Buber, Hadot, Foucault, R.D. Laing, and others. Students may not hold credit for PHIL 2710 and any of: the former PHIL 2820 or the former PHIL 2821.

Mutually Exclusive: PHIL 2820, PHIL 2821

Attributes: Humanities

PHIL 2730  Fundamentals of the Philosophy of Religion  3 cr  

A critical study of some fundamental problems in the philosophy of religion, such as the existence and nature of God, the justification of religious beliefs, the status of mystical and other religious experiences, and the significance of religious discourse. Students may not hold credit for PHIL 2730 and any of: PHIL 2701 or the former PHIL 2700.

Mutually Exclusive: PHIL 2700, PHIL 2701

Attributes: Humanities

PHIL 2740  Ethics and Biomedicine  3 cr  

An examination of some contemporary ethical theories and their application to a few important ethical issues in contemporary medicine and biology. Examples of topics to be covered include: euthanasia and medically assisted suicide, human reproductive cloning, and human enhancement. Students may not hold credit for PHIL 2740 and any of: PHIL 2741 or PHIL 2290 or PHIL 2531.

Equiv To: PHIL 2741

Mutually Exclusive: PHIL 2290, PHIL 2531

Attributes: Humanities

PHIL 2750  Ethics and the Environment  3 cr  

An examination of some important ethical issues connected with environmental pollution and resource depletion. Examples to be covered include: the ideal of liberty and environmental limits; scarcity and the ideal of justice; growth vs. steady-state economics; animal rights, and survival ethics vs. welfare ethics. Students may not hold credit for PHIL 2750 and any of: PHIL 2751 or PHIL 2290 or the former PHIL 2531.

Equiv To: PHIL 2751

Mutually Exclusive: PHIL 2290, PHIL 2531

Attributes: Humanities

PHIL 2770  Philosophy of Art  6 cr  

An introductory analysis of some contemporary aesthetic theories and an examination of such problems as the relation between art and morality, meaning and expression in art, the nature and functioning of criticism, and the justification of standards of aesthetic evaluation.

Attributes: Humanities

PHIL 2790  Moral Philosophy  6 cr  

An introduction to moral philosophy and influential moral philosophers of the past and present. The main emphasis will be on the nature and justification of moral judgement. Philosophers such as Sidgwick, Kant, Rawls, Scanlon, and Ross will be discussed.

Attributes: Humanities, Written English Requirement

PHIL 2800  Contemporary Political Philosophy  3 cr  

An examination of recent theories about whether there should be political authority, who should wield it, what is its proper scope and what are the duties and rights of citizens. The course will deal with representatives of such positions as anarchism, communism, conservatism, liberalism. Students may not hold credit for both PHIL 2800 and the former PHIL 3710.

PR/CR: A minimum grade of C is required unless otherwise indicated.
Prerequisite: successful completion of 30 hours of university credit.

Mutually Exclusive: PHIL 3710

Attributes: Humanities

PHIL 2830  Business Ethics  3 cr  

The course will explore the application of ethical theory to business. Topics to be discussed will normally include: theories of justice, corporate responsibility, the ethics of advertising, consumer and environmental protection, and preferential hiring. Students may not hold credit for both PHIL 2830 and PHIL 2831.

Attributes: Humanities

PHIL 2840  The Ethics of War and Peace  3 cr  

A study of the ethical issues connected with war and the securing of peace, as articulated in the writings of major philosophers and selected political and military thinkers. Relevant moral theories, such as non-violence, holy war, the just war, the ethical reasoning underlying policies of deterrence, will be critically examined in historical and contemporary context. Students may not hold credit for both PHIL 2840 and PHIL 2841.

Attributes: Humanities

PHIL 2860  Philosophy of Law  3 cr  

An introduction to the philosophy of law and to rule systems generally. Sample topics include the concept of law (law and religion; natural law; and the "laws of the books"); the connection, if any, between law and morality; and the politics of law in Canada and elsewhere. Students may not hold credit for both PHIL 2860 and PHIL 2861.

Attributes: Humanities

PHIL 2870  Philosophy and Law  3 cr  

An inquiry into the philosophy of law, on issues not covered in PHIL 2860. Students will examine such topics as: guilt and responsibility; theories of punishment; the right to dissent; legal reasoning; and, "professional ethics." Students may not hold credit for both PHIL 2870 and PHIL 2871.

Equiv To: PHIL 2871

Attributes: Humanities

PHIL 3220  Feminist Philosophy  3 cr  

An examination of philosophical issues of special interest to students of feminism and women's issues. Topics typically include: feminist epistemology, metaphysical implications of feminism, and feminist ethics.

PR/CR: A minimum grade of C is required unless otherwise indicated.
Prerequisite: [a grade of "C" or better in six credit hours in Philosophy] or written consent of department head.

Attributes: Humanities, Written English Requirement

PHIL 3290  Self-Transformation in Religion and Philosophy  3 cr  

This course examines contemporary expressions of spiritual exercises by tracing their traditions across an array of western religious and philosophical schools. The course explores themes of death, asceticism, aestheticism, everydayness and community. In particular, it explores how dialogue, reading, and writing have constituted tools for the cultivation of mental, physical and emotional states leading to self-transformation. Also offered as RLGN 3290. May not be held with RLGN 3290.

Equiv To: RLGN 3290

Attributes: Humanities

PHIL 3430  Problems in Legal Philosophy  3 cr  

A treatment of some problems arising in the philosophy of law including responsibility and the doctrine of mens rea, theories of punishment, law and morality, and the concept of law.

PR/CR: A minimum grade of C is required unless otherwise indicated.
Prerequisite: written consent of department head.

Attributes: Humanities

PHIL 3440  Problems in Social and Political Philosophy  3 cr  

A treatment of selected problems arising in social and political philosophy, e.g., the philosophy of the state, distributive justice, and the ethics of revolution.

PR/CR: A minimum grade of C is required unless otherwise indicated.
Prerequisite: written consent of department head.

Attributes: Humanities

PHIL 3580  Kant  3 cr  

A study of the 18th-century German thinker, Immanuel Kant, focusing on the revolutionary theories about reality and human knowledge contained in his major metaphysical work, The Critique of Pure Reason.

PR/CR: A minimum grade of C is required unless otherwise indicated.
Prerequisite: [a grade of "C" or better in one of: PHIL 2630 or PHIL 2631 or PHIL 2640 or PHIL 2641] or written consent of department head.

Attributes: Humanities

PHIL 3630  Contemporary Epistemology  3 cr  

A critical examination of contemporary issues in the theory of knowledge including recent empiricist attempts to resolve the problem of justifying belief. Typical topics include foundations of knowledge, the concept of "truth", radical scepticism, the new riddle of induction, normative epistemology, the psychology and sociology of knowledge. The course content may vary. Students can earn multiple credits for this course only when the topic subtitle is different.

PR/CR: A minimum grade of C is required unless otherwise indicated.
Prerequisite: [a grade of "C" or better in PHIL 2140 or the former PHIL 2760] or written consent of department head.

Attributes: Humanities

PHIL 3650  Contemporary Metaphysics  3 cr  

A course in contemporary metaphysics. Possible topics include the metaphysics of causation, time and persistence, laws and modality, essence, and fundamentality. The course content may vary. Students can earn multiple credits for this course only when the topic subtitle is different.

PR/CR: A minimum grade of C is required unless otherwise indicated.
Prerequisite: [a grade of "C" or better in PHIL 2580] or written permission of department head.

Attributes: Humanities

PHIL 3760  Topics in Moral Theory  3 cr  

A critical examination of issues in moral theory, such as consequentialism and deontology. The course content may vary. Students can earn multiple credits for this course only when the topic subtitle is different.

PR/CR: A minimum grade of C is required unless otherwise indicated.
Prerequisite: [a grade of "C" or better in PHIL 2790] or written consent of department head.

Attributes: Humanities

PHIL 3780  Research Topics in Philosophy  3 cr  

The course covers philosophical research on specialized topics. The course content may vary. Students can earn multiple credits for this course only when the topic subtitle is different.

PR/CR: A minimum grade of C is required unless otherwise indicated.
Prerequisite: written consent of department head.

Attributes: Humanities

PHIL 4460  Contemporary Issues  3 cr  

An intensive study of specially selected topics in contemporary philosophy. The subject matter of the course will vary from year to year. The course content may vary. Students can earn multiple credits for this course only when the topic subtitle is different.

PR/CR: A minimum grade of C is required unless otherwise indicated.
Prerequisite: written consent of department head.

Attributes: Humanities

PHIL 4490  Philosophy of Mind  3 cr  

A seminar concentrating on the analysis of consciousness. Topics include: mind and brain, the explanation of human behaviour, and whether or not machines and animals can think.

PR/CR: A minimum grade of C is required unless otherwise indicated.
Prerequisite: written consent of department head.

Attributes: Humanities

PHIL 4510  Philosophy of Language  3 cr  

An examination of problems such as the nature of meaning, grammar, semantics, reference, truth, and methodology in the study of language.

PR/CR: A minimum grade of C is required unless otherwise indicated.
Prerequisite: written consent of department head.

Attributes: Humanities

PHIL 4520  Historical Topics  3 cr  

Selected topics in the history of philosophy. The course content may vary. Students can earn multiple credits for this course only when the topic subtitle is different.

PR/CR: A minimum grade of C is required unless otherwise indicated.
Prerequisite: written consent of department head.

Attributes: Humanities

PHIL 4580  Honours Seminar  6 cr  

A seminar course with subject matter varying from year to year, designed to meet special needs of Honours Philosophy students.

PR/CR: A minimum grade of C is required unless otherwise indicated.
Prerequisite: written consent of department head.

Attributes: Humanities

PHIL 4610  Directed Reading in Philosophy  3 cr  

Subject matter will vary from year to year. The course content may vary. Students can earn multiple credits for this course only when the topic subtitle is different.

PR/CR: A minimum grade of C is required unless otherwise indicated.
Prerequisite: written consent of department head.

Attributes: Humanities

PHIL 4630  Symbolic Logic  3 cr  

Selected topics in mathematical logic, including propositional and quantificational logic, number theory, and the major metatheoretical results. The course content may vary. Students can earn multiple credits for this course only when the topic subtitle is different.

PR/CR: A minimum grade of C is required unless otherwise indicated.
Prerequisite: written consent of department head.

Attributes: Humanities